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Blast
rank 7
Posted:
Fri Sep 04, 2009 3:50 pm
quote : #1
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Posts: 58
OK Ive looked up a bit of info on this fault and the most common fix seems to be just cleaning the carts. I have two NES consoles that I just bough, they both have this fault. IT happens right from when you switch the console on. Is this just what NES systems do when they are switched on without a cart in? Or does this suggest I may need new Internal connector?

Anyway, off to try the first fix, cleaning games with alcohol Twisted Evil Sounds like fun! Mr. Green

Laters

Last edited by Blast on Sun Sep 20, 2009 9:04 am; edited 1 time in total
 
lordnikon
rank 47
Posted:
Fri Sep 04, 2009 7:39 pm
quote : #2
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Posts: 1631
Type: NTSC-U/C
You aren't supposed to power on the system without a cart in it.

If you are having trouble booting carts in the unit, or the system resets or has glitchy sprites, then you need to clean/refurbish the NES. Which I still have to do more research on myself.
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lazybum
rank 10
Posted:
Fri Sep 04, 2009 10:44 pm
quote : #3
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Posts: 142
Type: NTSC-U/C
Yes my nes's flash like that when no game is in. Your nes will probably do that at first when you have a game in as well. Usually, repositioning the game and trying for a bit will get the game working. Like lordnikon said, you can try cleaning the carts and the pins inside the system and that should make things work better. I have even heard that sometimes the pins inside the nes get stretched out and need to be pushed together with plyers or something. Worst case scenario, you could buy a new set of pins for the inside of your NES off amazon.com or lots of other sites.

But first try the system with a game in it lol.

Last edited by lazybum on Sat Sep 05, 2009 6:59 am; edited 1 time in total
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Blast
rank 7
Posted:
Sat Sep 05, 2009 6:45 am
quote : #4
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Posts: 58
Thanks guys

Yes I had tried the system with a game in Very Happy I need to spend some time now giving the games a good clean first then maybe after the NES its self. I read a guide from a retro shop on ebay that said you can open carts for better cleaning but you need a special tool. Anyone know any good alternatives to the special tool? To change the connector pins is an easy job (so say the guides) takes about 20 mins on your first go and they can be bought on Ebay for around 7 think thats about $11.

Laters
 
lazybum
rank 10
Posted:
Sat Sep 05, 2009 7:01 am
quote : #5
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Posts: 142
Type: NTSC-U/C
The special tool is easy to find as well and I do not think it cost too much. However, somewhere on the internet before I heard one guy say he made one by heating up the end of something plastic and cramming it onto the screws on the nes cartridge while it was starting to melt on the end. That way once the plastic cooled it would now fit into those weird nes screws.
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It's a me! Slow Motion Matrixy Mario Kart!
MasquedWarrior
rank 8
Posted:
Sun Sep 06, 2009 6:03 am
quote : #6
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Posts: 75
Type: NTSC-U/C
The tool for opening cartridges is a 3.8 mm security bit. I'm not sure how deep of a tunnel the screw head is buried on an NES cart; I haven't seen one in a while. If the screw is easy to access, you could use two nails or screws as handles, and put them in notches on opposite sides of the head, using them to spin it around.
 
lordnikon
rank 47
Posted:
Sun Sep 06, 2009 4:49 pm
quote : #7
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Posts: 1631
Type: NTSC-U/C
NCSX sells these. They are often called "GameBits":

http://www.ncsxshop.com/cgi-bin/shop/NUS-45MM.html
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Homeland Character: トライジール (TRIZEAL)
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Blast
rank 7
Posted:
Sun Sep 20, 2009 9:03 am
quote : #8
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Posts: 58
Ive recently obtained a lot more Retro Nintendo consoles. At first none worked then I read on the net to blow in the console and the cart. This worked when blowing in the cart, blowing in the console didnt seem to make much difference (very successful for N64). I'll have to try this first for the Nes and snes games I have as I hadnt read this before. I would be easy to blow into a Snes console but the NES is a bit more concealed. Thinking though! Is it actually a good idea to blow into consoles? Ive been told its a very bad thing to do to PC,s and they are both a collection of circuit boards.

(Please refrain from entering into puerile thoughs and jokes about blowing into consoles, many thanks)

Laters
 
lazybum
rank 10
Posted:
Sun Sep 20, 2009 11:00 am
quote : #9
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Posts: 142
Type: NTSC-U/C
I never find blowing on cartridges to help my nes read the game at all. It seems like the position of the game in the nes matters a lot more. For my nes, keeping the game as close to the front edge of the system as possible seems to make the games work. Although, I have read online that for other people pushing the cartridge as far back as possible works the best.

I don't really think that blowing into the console will do much either. Especially since the pins are so far back in the system. You would have to blow really hard to even make your breath reach the back, plus if you did that I imagine that a lot of spit is going to fly inside your console.

The apparent permanent solution to nes game reading problems is to clean the consoles pins, buy new pins, or get a toploader nes hehe. I want one but they cost significantly more than a toaster style original nes.
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It's a me! Slow Motion Matrixy Mario Kart!
Blast
rank 7
Posted:
Mon Sep 21, 2009 5:38 pm
quote : #10
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Posts: 58
Well I have not got round to testing the NES systems again yet but this seems to work miracles on the N64 and Snes systems. One non functioning Snes console fixed by simply blowing the cart slot, and about five N64 games fixed by blowing the pins. Accepted Nes is older and probably different but worth a try before everything else none the less. Ohh also fixed a gameboy advance cart in the same way.

Ready steady ....... PUUUUFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF

Laters

Add to that now 2 x Nes consoles fixed by blowing in them. If you do look into the Nes consoles you can actually see the cart receptor. As its in a confined area it is actually good for blowing on, you get a fair bit of feedback lol. One Nes console has an unrelated fault but I am pleased noen the less. The success of this very basic fix is astonishing.
 
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